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18 July 2016 @ 07:59 am

Series: Dissonance #1

Cover:

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Genre:
YA Science Fiction

This is the book for you if you like:
- Alternate universes
- Original world building
- Romance in your science fiction

Summary: (from author’s website)

For Delancey Sullivan, alternate universes aren't just a theory: they're a way of life. Every time someone makes a choice—to eat breakfast or skip it, to sneak out or stay in bed—parallel realities are created, and echo versions of ourselves take the roads not traveled in the Key World. As a Walker, Del navigates between the Echoes, keeping the dimensions in harmony. But when her own choices go horribly wrong, she must decide between her heart and her duty—and live with the consequences.

First sentence:

It seemed like a lousy way to remember someone: two aging strips of wood nailed together in the shape of a cross, stuck into a weed-choked ditch on the side of the road.

Thoughts on covers:

I love the colours on all the covers (hardcover, paperback, Spanish edition respectively), but I love the middle cover the most. Maybe because I usually prefer covers without people, but also because I think the origami stars are important enough to the story to warrant being on the cover.

Title:

I love the title. It fits the story, both because of its content and its atmosphere.

Why did I read this book?

I love parallel universes. It’s one of the science fiction themes I love best, so when this one came up on Riveted I didn’t feel like I had any choice but to read it.

Characters:

Dellancy Sullivan, named Del, is a girl with a rebellious an independent streak. She’s always had to fight against her sister’s perfection until the point where she just gave up and wholeheartedly embraced the rebellion. I liked her. She was reckless in a way that I could understand, in a way that didn’t make me want to scream at her on every other page (which has definitely happened with other main characters, let me tell you). She’s a bit self-centred at times, but again, this was written in a way that made sense to me; she’s a teenager, and her world, sheltered as it’s been, pretty much existed of just her, so how could she not be?

It’s hard for me to pinpoint Simon, the love interest. He’s important to the story, sure, and we get a sense of how important he is to Del and how he makes her feel; both crucial to understanding the book, but as a reader you don’t really get a feel for Simon. But seeing him through Del’s eyes, it’s almost impossible not to like him – the author certainly didn’t go out of her way to give him a personality, but on the plus side, she also didn’t make him a complete jerk.

Monty, Del’s grandfather, is the most important side character and the character I was most fascinated by. I would love to hear his entire story; love to follow some parts of his life and try to figure him out. He’s suffered from frequency poisoning and while he’s presenting himself as not entirely lucid, he seems perfectly fine when it’s about things that are important to him. Addison, Del’s sister, is quite interesting too; even though we see her through Del’s eyes, which do not paint her favourably, I still felt drawn to her. She might be the ‘perfect sister’, but I don’t think that truly came naturally to her, and she must struggle with a lot of demons herself.

Setting:

Dissonance is set in a world just like ours, except in this world there are alternate universes; every choice someone makes, springs up an echo in which that someone made another choice. Walkers go between worlds and ensure that the Key World, where the Originals live, stays whole.

I absolutely loved the world building in this story. Some chapters open with excerpts from the Walkers training manuals, which is a structure I will never tire of. But even without those excerpts, there are details sprinkled over every page, and I thought it was absolutely fascinating. However, that also means this isn’t an easy read; you need to pay attention to every page and really absorb the terminology in order to get a feel for this vast multiverse.

General story:

Dissonance is a science fiction story with a distinct romantic flavour; while I wouldn’t call it a romance per se, it is true that Simon, the love interest, is at the centre of the story. It didn’t bother me as much as it could have, though maybe that’s just because I’m a sucker for an impossible love story. But also because the romance is very much in function of the story; without Simon the events between worlds wouldn’t have happened either, and his tale is as much caught up – maybe more even – in the alternate universe part of the story as it is in the romance.

The rhythm ebbed and flowed, with some chapters rushing through events while others lingered for a while. I really enjoyed following the tide of this book, until it picked up speed at the end and it sacrificed some making-sense to finishing the story. I suppose the second book will help with the making sense part, and I wouldn’t be surprised if on rereading after having read the second part, the ending doesn’t feel rushed at all. But for now, I would have appreciated a little more time to figure out what was going on and who was involved.

Will I read the other instalments in this series?

Yes, I’m very excited about that!

Overall rating: 5/5

 
 
03 April 2016 @ 05:04 pm
Cover:

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Genre: YA Romance

This is the book for you if you like:

- Student/teacher romances
- Books that start with the end
- Books in which music plays a huge role.

Summary: (from author’s website)

Bea has a secret.

Actually, she has more than one. There’s her dreams for the future that she can’t tell anyone—not her father and not even her best friend, Plum.

And now there’s Dane Rossi. Dane is hot, he shares Bea’s love of piano, and he believes in her.

He’s also Bea’s teacher.

When their passion for music crosses into passion for each other, Bea finds herself falling completely for Dane. She’s never felt so wanted, so understood, so known to her core. But the risk of discovery carries unexpected surprises that could shake Bea entirely. Bea must piece together what is and isn’t true about Dane, herself, and the most intense relationship she’s ever experienced, in this absorbing novel from Nancy Ohlin.

First sentence:

The police officer switches on the video camera, and its red light blink blink blinks at me.

Thoughts on covers:

I quite like the cover. It’s intriguing.

Title:

I feel like the title is a little… misleading, actually. Though I guess it makes sense in the context of the framing of the book.

Why did I read this book?

Ever since falling in love with my teacher when I was 15, I’ve promised myself I’d read every book I could find on it to find the ones that could really capture that feeling. As such, I was really excited when this one came up on Riveted.

Characters:

Bea was freaking annoying. I found it absolutely impossible to root for this secretive, lying person who seems to think that she’s the only one with feelings.

But Dane, him I absolutely loved. He was talented, caring, loving… Maybe a little too prone to follow his heart at times, a little too passionate, but that only made me like him more.

Setting:

The book is set… well, somewhere, I guess. The place doesn’t really matter. What does matter is the music, which is almost a character on its own in this book. I love how the different pieces, the different ways of playing them, and really every bit of music conveys its own emotions and brings something to the story that would have been flat without it.

General story:

The sight of [the couple] makes my heart hurt. They seem to have figured out this relationship thing – this love thing – and right now I feel as though I will never, ever comprehend it. How do people know? What is it that I feel for Dane, exactly? Is it a dumb crush? Daddy issues? Am I flattered by his attention? Desperate for someone to encourage my piano playing? Or am I genuinely drawn to his intelligence and talent and kindness?

Or is love just one big, messy combination of all of the above?

When Consent gets it right, it gets it absolutely, beautifully right. Passages as the one above are why I would recommend this story, even though I struggled through it at times.

I love the way the relationship between Bea and Dane grew organically, based on their mutual interests and passions instead of just being… superficially drawn to each other. I rolled my eyes at the way it ended, however; their stupidity made it really hard for me to care about them being caught.

Will I read other books from this author?

Probably not.

Overall rating: 3/5

 
 
25 February 2016 @ 04:31 pm

Series: Shatter me #1

Cover:

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Genre: YA (Dystopian) Romance

This is the book for you if you like:

- Stories that derive from emotion instead of action
- Romance stories against a dystopian background

Summary: (from author’s website)

Juliette hasn’t touched anyone in exactly 264 days.

The last time she did, it was an accident, but The Reestablishment locked her up for murder. No one knows why Juliette’s touch is fatal. As long as she doesn’t hurt anyone else, no one really cares. The world is too busy crumbling to pieces to pay attention to a 17-year-old girl. Diseases are destroying the population, food is hard to find, birds don’t fly anymore, and the clouds are the wrong color.

The Reestablishment said their way was the only way to fix things, so they threw Juliette in a cell. Now so many people are dead that the survivors are whispering war– and The Reestablishment has changed its mind. Maybe Juliette is more than a tortured soul stuffed into a poisonous body. Maybe she’s exactly what they need right now.

Juliette has to make a choice:

Be a weapon. Or be a warrior.

First sentence:

I’ve been locked up for 264 days.

Thoughts on covers:

I quite like the cover of my edition (the first cover); somehow, it speaks to me. I’ve chosen the other two covers among the surprising plethora of different covers for this book because I liked them: I like the colours and the magic of the French cover, and how the way she’s framed fits with the loneliness of the book, and I absolutely love how the Swedish cover has integrated the crossed out word with the title.

Title:

I love the title, it’s just so powerful.

Why did I read this book?

I actually gave this as a present to my wife a couple of years ago because she loves dystopian stories. I figured I’d give it a try myself.

Characters:

Juliette is the main character. She’s emotional in a way that feels stoic to the outside; but as you’re in her head, you get to go on this rollercoaster with her. Life hasn’t exactly been easy for her, and I loved seeing how she was still willing to fight. This is a girl who even after 264 days of isolation just doesn’t give up. That’s absolutely amazing to me.

I really liked Adam. I liked that he cared, I liked that we got some view into his backstory that explained why he does what he does. Is he the most well-rounded character ever? Probably not, but his feelings for Juliette do make sense, as do Juliette’s feelings for him. I’ve heard people complain about this being insta-love, but I genuinely wonder how people can read this story and think this was about ultimate love at first sight. I just don’t see it.

Setting:

The story is set in a dystopian world. The world has gone to pieces, and The Reestablishment has taken over. On the one hand, you don’t really get a feel for what the world is like, as Juliette very much lives in her head. On the other hand, the vast emptiness of the world is something you can feel even in Juliette’s world view.

More important to the story, is Juliette’s world, in which her touch can kill – something she can’t control.

General story:

The writing, oh, the writing. I guess it’s the kind of style that you either love or hate (and the Goodreads reviews definitely seem to support this theory…) and I loved it. It’s incredibly poetic and emotional, and not just the crossed out parts either. This is not your everyday style of writing, and it had me glued to the book. I would just like to quote two of my favourite parts:

He’s wrong he’s so wrong he’s more wrong than an upside-down rainbow.
But everything he said is right.

And:

I’m an embarrassing mess of nerves crashing into him, controlled by one current of electricity coursing through my core. His scent is assaulting my senses.


His eyes
His hands
His chest
His lips
are at my ear when he speaks.

But I could probably quote half the book if I didn’t stop myself.

Did the story matter? With that kind of writing, not so much to me. But I did get caught up in it, and I was quite surprised by the ending (I truly had not seen that part coming), and am looking forward to reading the next book.

Will I read the other instalments in this series?

Definitely.

Overall rating: 5/5

 
 
25 February 2016 @ 03:26 pm

Series: Potion #1

Cover:

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Genre: YA Urban Fantasy

This is the book for you if you like:

- Harry Potter’s potion classes
- Smart heroines
- Stories in which romance takes the backburner to adventure

Summary: (from author’s website)

When the Princess of Nova accidentally poisons herself with a love potion meant for her crush, she falls crown-over-heels in love with her own reflection. Oops. A nationwide hunt is called to find the cure, with competitors travelling the world for the rarest ingredients, deep in magical forests and frozen tundras, facing death at every turn.

Enter Samantha Kemi – an ordinary girl with an extraordinary talent. Sam’s family were once the most respected alchemists in the kingdom, but they’ve fallen on hard times, and winning the hunt would save their reputation. But can Sam really compete with the dazzling powers of the ZoroAster megapharma company? Just how close is Sam willing to get to Zain Aster, her dashing former classmate and enemy, in the meantime?

And just to add to the pressure, this quest is ALL OVER social media. And the world news.

No big deal, then.

First sentence:

A tiny bead of blood bloomed where the knifepoint pressed against the tip of her finger.

Thoughts on covers:

I prefer the “Madly” cover over the “The Potion Diaries” cover, but I gotta say, there’s something chillingly beautiful about the Czech cover…

Title:

I’m not sure why the title changed; Madly sounds way more exciting to me than The Potion Diaries, though I can see where the latter title came from and it does fit the story.

Why did I read this book?

It was one of the free books on Riveted, and the moment I saw this was about potions, I got really excited. What can I say, I’ve got a thing for alchemists.

Characters:

The main character, Samantha Kemi, is absolutely awesome. She’s smart, in a way that is actually shown instead of just being told, and she’s fierce. You can just feel that she loves potions, and while she might not exactly love the adventure, her excitement about going on this hunt is palpable on every page.

There are a couple of side characters, my favourite being Kirsty. Sam’s family consists of Alchemists, and Kirsty is their Finder; the one who goes out in the Wilde to actually collect all the ingredients the Alchemists need to mix their potions. She is awesome. She reminds me a bit of Hayley in Castle; that same incessant need for adventure, that mischievous streak, that utter belief in her own abilities and those of the ones around her.

Zain, the love interest, was okay. The romance is definitely not the focal point of this story, and as such he doesn’t really get a lot of character development, but he was sincere enough for me to root for him and Sam.

Setting:

Madly is set in a world like ours, albeit with quite some differences. It’s similar enough for me to brand this as an urban fantasy, though I get why people would call it high fantasy. It’s a very modern take on magic that’s for sure.

Magic is everywhere in this world; the people are divided into Talenteds and ordinaries, and those who are Talented get all the privilege. Then there are those with an inherent talent – though not Talent, as it’s not magic – for potions, among which is Sam’s family.

The story starts as the royal princess goes into mortal danger, putting into event an ancient tradition of the Wilde Hunt: every alchemist gets called upon to mix a cure, and the one who gets it right (it has to be put into a horn, and the horn will recognise the right potion and turn golden), saves the royal family – and gets a price, of course.

General story:

I absolutely loved this book. I loved everything about it. I love the extensive world building, I love how much magic there is in this book, how the potion brewing is not just an added aspect but permeated in every chapter, permeated in Sam’s being until the point where she’s just spouting ingredient properties because her brain won’t shut off.

I loved the chapters in which we get the POV of Evelyn, the poisoned princess. Most authors would only keep her on the edges of the story, only show us her story through the eyes of the people around her, but Alward gets us into her head and I thought that was fascinating.

Will I read the other instalments in this series?

I absolutely cannot wait until it will be released! That said, the book doesn’t really seem set up for a sequel, and I’m not sure a second part could actually live up to the expectations this first book has created.

Overall rating: 5/5

 
 
Series: To all the boys I’ve loved before #1

Cover:

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Genre: YA Romance

This is the book for you if you like:

- Fake dating (in order to make someone jealous)
- Family dynamics

Summary: (from author’s website)

LARA JEAN keeps her love letters in a hatbox her mother gave her. They aren’t love letters that anyone else wrote for her, these are ones she’s written. One for every boy she’s ever loved.

When she writes, she can pour out her heart and soul and say all the things she would never say in real life, because her letters are for her eyes only.

Until the day her secret letters are mailed, and suddenly Lara Jean’s love life goes from imaginary to out of control.

First sentence:

I like to save things.

Thoughts on covers:

I like the cover, though I’m not quite sure the contemplative, writing girl on the book has anything to do with Lara Jean. Instead of a million different covers, nearly every edition in every language looks practically the same. The only one with a slightly different take on the “Writing on the bed” theme was the Polish one (right), and that one is way too sexualised.

Title:

I love the title. The title is the whole reason I wanted to read this book. It’s awesome.

Why did I read this book?

Because of the title and because I’d heard so many great things about it.

Characters:

Lara Jean was incredibly annoying. She's supposed to be sixteen, but she read so much younger to me. She thinks herself better than most anyone and thinks she's so smart and mature while in fact she's very naïve and childish.

Peter and Josh, the two male parts of this love triangle, are both a little... Bland. Since Lara Jean is in a fake relationship with Peter, he gets a bit more character development (though that’s still not a whole lot), and thus you automatically start rooting for them. Josh pretty much comes off as a guy who thinks he's entitled to a girl because he saw her first (even though he never as much as mentioned his interest to Lara Jean).

The only character I really liked was Kitty, Lara Jean's sister, who knows what she wants and isn't afraid to go after it. Feisty, that one!

Setting:

The book is set in Richmond, Virginia, but could have been set in any other town with a high school.

General story:

I really wanted to love this book, I really did. But I just couldn't. For one, the letters, which was the part of the summary that convinced me to read this book after falling in love with the title, didn't turn out to have much to do with the story. I had hoped they'd play a bigger part, but instead they were just a catalyst for the rest of the story. They were hardly even mentioned after Josh and Peter discovered theirs. That said, I'm glad the question of who sent them out wasn't featured heavily, because that was obvious from the very beginning.

Two, while I love the trope of a fake relationship turning into a real one, I wasn't a fan of how much jealousy played a part in this book - faking a relationship to make someone jealous and then revelling in their jealousy just doesn't sit well with me.

I also wasn't a fan of the writing style and had to struggle through this book. I was actually relieved when it was finished!

Will I read the other instalments in this series?

Oh no, this one took me long enough.

Overall rating: 2/5

 
 
 
11 February 2016 @ 02:40 pm

Publisher: Image
Written by: Simon Spurrier
Art by: Ryan Kelly

Official recap of series:

BEHOLD THE MODERN MONSTROSITY. X-Men Legacy writer SIMON SPURRIER and superstar artist RYAN KELLY present fiends, fragility, and firepower in an all-new series, mixing the hard-boiled militaria of Jarhead with the dark folklore of Pan's Labyrinth. Includes an unprecedented use of multiple colorists (MATT WILSON, LEE LOUGHRIDGE, & NICK FILARDI) to define the story's threads, and an incredible variant cover by Eisner Award winner CAMERON STEWART. This is not the tale of a lesbian werewolf who goes to war. Except it kind of is.

Favourite panel:

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Favourite line:

So. You been starin’ at those bars a while now, huh? You mind me askin’ something? You figured out yet which side you’re on, sister? Like… are you inside the cage? Or out?

Quick review:

This comic came with the tagline:

This is not the tale of a lesbian werewolf who goes to war. Except it kind of is.

How is anyone supposed to resist that? And I am so happy I didn’t resist. This comic was amazing. I loved the writing. I loved the different timelines. I love the characters. And the absolute best part? It came annotated. Seriously, an almost page-by-page look at the comic with extra information. I loved that. I already can’t wait to get my hands on the next issue.

 
 
29 January 2016 @ 11:10 am

Series: Hex Hall #3
(See Hex Hall and Demonglass for my review of the first two parts)

Cover:

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Genre: YA Fantasy

This is the book for you if you like:

- Real friendships
- Kickass heroines
- Star-crossed lovers

Summary: (blurb)

Talk about terrible timing…

Just as Sophie Mercer has come to accept her extraordinary magical powers as a demon, the Prodigium Council strips them away. With her powers locked inside her, Sophie is defenceless. Or at least that’s what she thinks, until she makes a surprising discovery. An epic war is coming, and it is believed that Sophie is the only one powerful enough to stop the world from ending. But without her magic, Sophie isn’t so sure.

The only spell that can help is at Hex Hall – the place where it all began. Even with the vampire Jenna; her boyfriend, Archer; her fiancé, Cal (yeah, her love life is complicated); and a somewhat friendly ghost at her side, the fate of all Prodigium rests on Sophie’s shoulders alone.

Sophie’s bound for one hell of a ride… Can she get her powers back before it’s too late?

First sentence:

There are times when magic really sucks.

Thoughts on covers:

Apparently they haven’t released this one in the sparkly cover, which is good. I’ve gotten quite attached to the two-way covers, so that one if my favourite. The Spanish cover (middle) isn’t nearly as pretty as the one for Demonglass, but I do think the Bulgarian one (right) is quite pretty.

Title:

I love the title, if only for the so easy pun that this book had me spellbound!

Why did I read this book?

I loved the first two books. I’ve had this one in my closet for a while, mostly because a part of me was a little scared that it would be a disappointment, so I kept putting off reading it.

Characters:

I just love every single one of them. Sophie and Jenna are two of my favourite characters ever, and I will not get over how awesome their friendship is in a genre that is so riddled with main characters hating their supposed friends.

I reread the first two parts before reading this one, and I really love what Hawkins has done with Archer. He starts as this out of reach love interest, and by the third book he is someone you trust even though you know you shouldn't. Same goes for Elodie, who goes through such character development without losing any of her personality.

Cal is a little less developed than the rest of them, a little more cardboard, but there's no doubt at all that he's a good person.

The new characters don't get much in the sense of personality or character development, but that's okay: no need to introduce new complicated characters in the last part of a trilogy when there's still so much to say about the main characters.

Setting:

To my delight this story returns to Hex Hall. I love stories that come full circle, and this one definitely did that in a lot of ways. The book also introduces the Brannick compound (not all that interesting) and hell (which was a chilling read).

General story:

The story, oh, the story! Usually a trilogy shows down the pace a bit in the second part. Not this one though, and I was a bit scared that this third part wouldn't be able to deliver. But oh, it did! It does slow down a bit in the first part of Spellbound, but the exact moment it feels like it's going to drag on, everything changes and the second part starts.

I cried, I laughed, I gasped, I got chills, I extended my lunch break because I couldn't fathom not knowing how this would continue. I have no doubt that I will read this trilogy over and over again, because it just had it all.

Will I read other books from this author?

I can’t wait! I’m definitely going to try the spinoff, even though the Brannicks didn’t really intrigue me in this book. And I’ll also give her other book, Rebel Belle, a go.

Overall rating: 5/5

 
 
16 January 2016 @ 04:17 pm

Publisher: Marvel
Written by: G. Willow Wilson
Art by: Adrian Alphona

Official recap of series:

Marvel Comics presents the all-new Ms. Marvel, the groundbreaking heroine that has become an international sensation! Kamala Khan is an ordinary girl from Jersey City - until she is suddenly empowered with extraordinary gifts. But who truly is the all-new Ms. Marvel? Teenager? Muslim? Inhuman? Find out as she takes the Marvel Universe by storm! As Kamala discovers the dangers of her newfound powers, she unlocks a secret behind them as well. Is Kamala ready to wield these immense new gifts? Or will the weight of the legacy before her be too much to handle? Kamala has no idea either. But she's comin' for you, New York!

Favourite panel:

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Favourite line:

Everybody else gets to be normal. Why can’t I?

Quick review:

Ms. Marvel is very much a book about identity: who are you, and how do you find a balance between every part of you? Kamala Khan is the perfect embodiment of this question: she already struggled with being a Muslim girl in a non-Muslim society, and the added weight of suddenly developing superpowers is only intensifying these questions. I love how the comic focuses on both parts of her: as she’s figuring out who she is, she’s testing both the limits of her power and the limits within her family. I also really love the details in the art – I found myself looking through Kamala’s room and focussing on stuff like which stuffed animals she got.

However, no matter how easily I breezed through the story and liked it, I was left with a feeling of “Well, that was a perfectly fine story.” I’m not desperately hoping to read the next one, and by now (about three days after I read the comic), most of the things that have happened have already slipped my mine. I’m not sure whether it’s the fact that this is my first encounter with Ms. Marvel, or the writing, but I just wasn’t emotionally invested in any of it.

 
 

Cover:

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Genre: YA Romance

This is the book for you if you like:

- Books that deal realistically with bisexuality

Summary: (from author’s website)

While Sergio is attracted to both girls and guys, he’s only dated girls before. Lance has always known he’s gay, but he’s never had a serious boyfriend. When they meet, there’s an instant sizzle, and they know that they’ve got something special. But will it be enough to overcome their differences?

Allie has been into guys her whole life, and she’s been in a relationship with her boyfriend, Chip, for two years. But when she meets Kimiko, despite everything she thinks she knows about her own sexuality, she realizes she’s falling for her—hard. And Kimiko has been crushing on Allie since the moment they met, but it’s impossible for her to believe that a bombshell like Allie could be interested in her. Can they find their way together to a relationship?

First sentence:

Lance tapped the beat of A Chorus Line’s “What I Did for Love” on Allie’s bedroom door.

Thoughts on covers & title:

Combining these two, because I love both the cover and the title so much – more than the actual book, unfortunately, but still. They’re both amazing.

Why did I read this book?

I’m looking for books that include bisexuality, and this one totally fit the bill.

Characters:

The book is so focused on relationships, that I didn't really get a feel for the characters themselves. Kimiko is probably the one with the most personality, since her struggle with her mom's disapproval over her boyish style are part of her story. She is also the only one that didn’t make cringe at any point – Allie’s Japanese fetishism made me very uncomfortable, as did Sergio with how he totally unnecessary complicated his relationship with Lance. At least Lance’s insistence that bisexuality wasn’t a real thing got resolved by the end of the book.

Setting:

The book is set in a non-descript American town.

General story:

I wanted a book about bisexuality, and that’s definitely what I got. It truly sheds a light on it from quite a few different angles - there's the bisexual guy who's comfortable in his own skin, the gay guy who thinks bisexuals are just closeted gays, the straight girl who realises maybe she's not as straight as she always thought... While I might not agree with everything (the idea that you need to have experience with both sexes to know whether you're bisexual is unfortunately pretty prevalent in this book) I really do appreciate a book that takes my sexuality seriously. Thirteen year old me could have done with a book like this!

Unfortunately, the book could have done with better writing. It was quite chaotic, with changes in POV mid-paragraph (driving me absolutely crazy!), lots of condensed dialogue and quite a lot of unnecessary ellipses. I would have loved it if every chapter focused on just one of the four characters - even though their lives obviously got intertwined, the story itself could use a little structure.

Will I read other books from this author?

As the writing style really didn’t appeal to me, I’m not planning to.

Overall rating: 2,5/5

 
 
17 December 2015 @ 06:54 pm

Publisher: Marvel
Written by: Sam Humphries
Art by: Mike Del Mundo

Official recap of series:

From the pages of Secret Wars, now in the All-New Marvel U! Imagine being trapped in a world of sword and sorcery...with no sword and sorcery experience to speak of. This is the story of Becca, a girl stuck in Weirdworld, with only one mission: get home alive! Marvel's own twisted fantasy realm comes alive before your eyes! Barbarians! Wizards! And tricked out sports cars!

Favourite panel:

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Favourite line:

Goleta: Art thou… a wizard?
Becca: Uh… no? I, uh… art a senior in high school.

Quick review:

This world definitely was weird, that’s for sure. I picked up this issue because I love fantasy and I figured this was a good way to get started in the Marvel universe. I wasn’t in love with it, though; the story didn’t really grab me, despite how awesome I thought both Becca and Goleta were. I might pick up the next issue if nothing else that week grabs my attention, but so far I’m not in love.